Eliminating Cholera from Haiti – The last mile is the most difficult

Michel Ange supervising the a rapid response team at Carrefour

Port-au-Prince, April 2018: “It could be one of the most important activities happening in Haiti now,” states Michel Ange, team leader of one of the 58 rapid response teams working relentlessly to eliminate cholera in Haiti. “We are saving lives, educating the local population around hygiene practices, and helping to eradicate a killer bacterium.”

In 2017, for the first time since cholera was introduced to Haiti in 2010, the epidemic was under control and the highest suspected cases were concentrated in three out of the ten Departments: West (31%), Artibonite (29%) and Centre (19%). 2018 began with the lowest numbers recorded, 995 cases between January 1st and March 31st  compared to 4,248 cases for the same period last year (source: DELR/MSPP).  This evolution is largely due to a strategy that combines reinforced local coordination, surveillance, solid rapid response, and enhanced prevention through water chlorination and intensified hygiene awareness. With the support of UNICEF, the Ministry of Health launched this “alert-response” strategy in 2014, resulting in the activation of rapid response teams that are staffed with agents of the Ministry of Health response teams and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO). It required three years of close monitoring and technical support to reach a satisfactory level of performance, and now the results speak for themselves. Due to the availability of funding, all rapid response teams were activated in 2017, resulting in an unprecedented response rate of 95 percent to all suspected cases.

“We are good at what we do. You can see that in how the number of cases has dropped in the last year,” states Michel Ange. She is not showing off but simply stating a fact. Never has the chance to eliminate cholera been so close, yet the way there was hard. “It was an uphill battle but organizations like Solidarity International and UNICEF didn’t give up at all.”

UNICEF and the Ministry of Health continue to support a network of response teams nationwide. Four NGOs, are working hand in hand with the 13 teams from the Ministry of Health, called EMIRA (in French, Equipe Mobile d’Intervention Rapide), to deliver a complete package of activities: visiting affected households and an average of 12 houses living in a 50m perimeter around the patient’s house and establishing a “cordon sanitaire” to avoid the disease from spreading in the community. The teams provide oral prophylaxis to the patients and their families, disinfect homes, and distribute oral rehydration salt, soap and water chlorination tablets. They also secure water sources by establishing emergency water chlorination points or support DINEPA (National Directorate for Drinking Water and Sanitation) to chlorinate the water systems in affected areas when needed.

A rapid response team is distributing supplies to fight against cholera

These NGO teams are composed 100 percent with skilled Haitian professionals who have been trained to investigate and respond to suspected cases of cholera and other types of acute diarrhea, which directly benefit children as diarrhea remains one the main causes of child morbidity in Haiti.

Fund predictability also allowed for the improvement of complementary health and hygiene promotion activities and community mobilization, activities, crucial to ensure quick outbreak control. In addition to the work of response teams, UNICEF’s NGO partners deployed community engagement teams which reinforced the rapid response by conducting hygiene awareness interventions in schools, churches, places or events gathering people in affected areas, and food hygiene sensitization in public market places.

In the metropolitan region of Port-au-Prince, rapid response agents like Michel Ange have contributed to respond to approximately 5,000 suspected cholera cases in 2017, and to sensitize over 360,000 people in affected neighborhoods. It is a labor of passion and love. “Haiti is my home, my country, and I love it with all my heart. Of course, it is a difficult place, but with the help of organizations like Solidarités International and UNICEF, we are learning techniques to address our problems, to take over,” says Michel Ange with a smile. “My children will grow up in a stronger Haiti, a better Haiti than the one I had…we will all help each other to learn and grow together.”

Today, the situation invokes optimism but the fight is not over. To avoid a resurgence of the epidemic, an effective set-up must be maintained to ensure surveillance, prevention and response until the last case is gone; this requires steady and predictable funding.

Haiti: Institutional death due to Cholera, Epidemiological Week 7 (February 2018):

Strengthen cooperation in the fight against child domestic work

A presentation session at the meeting at UNICEF’s local

The main partners involved in the fight against child domestic work, redoubled efforts, alongside the Haitian government, to reduce the incidence of this phenomenon on children for their full development. To make the fight more effective, many initiatives are being taken, including the project to combat child domestic labor. The Joint Steering Committee for this project is part of these coordination mechanisms. Canadian Cooperation and the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labor (MAST) co-chair this structure, whose members come from international organizations such as UNICEF, the International Labor Organization (ILO), IOM and government agencies.

Port-au-Prince, March 29, 2018 – The members of the Joint Steering Committee met in the conference room of UNICEF to take stock of the progress of the project ” Fight against child domestic work in Haiti ”, discuss challenges and next steps in the implementation of the project.

Stéphanie Auguste, Minister of Social Affairs and Labor, emphasized the importance the Haitian Government attaches to the fight against child labor in view of its dramatic consequences. “The disastrous consequences of the worst forms of child labor are well established. They have irreversible effects on their health, education, and psycho-emotional development that are their most basic rights, “she said.

Later, the Minister stressed the need to develop synergistic actions against child domestic work “We must therefore without delay clear the ways and means to undertake actions that must be historic and do not wait,” she added. She also praised the cooperation in this area between the Haitian government, Canada, and the United Nations, particularly UNICEF.

Successful cooperation

Minister Stéphanie Auguste in a presentation, UNICEF Representative on the Right and Canada’s Head of Cooperation on the Left

Carlos Rojas-Arbulu, Head of Cooperation at the Canadian Embassy, addressed the efforts of the Haitian government, which has ratified several international conventions on human rights, including the Convention on the Rights of the Child. He also thanked UNICEF and its partners for their efforts to achieve progress in the implementation of the project against child domestic labor, through the results presented in the first annual report.

Finally, he encouraged UNICEF and partners to strengthen the gender equality strategy and coordination mechanism by welcoming the leadership of the Minister of Social Affairs and Labor.

Mr. Marc Vincent, UNICEF Representative in Haiti, recalled “the continued commitment of the Government of Haiti to the promotion and protection of the rights of the child”, emphasizing the leadership of the MAST in the sector.

He further recalled some important results since the beginning of the implementation of the project in April 2017 among which: the triggering of the dynamics to support the revision of the Labor Code and the way towards the adoption of the other legal texts such as the Child Protection Code and the list of hazardous work; the identification and care of 336 child domestic workers, 60% of whom are girls; identifying and supporting 2,357 families at risk of family separation to prevent child labor; identifying and supporting 1,215 children at risk or victims of violence, including GBV, 765 of whom are currently in school.

Figures that challenge

This project is taking place in three departments, including the South, Grand’Anse and the West, following the study on placement and child domestic work carried out in 2014. Per this study conducted by the Haitian Government with the UNICEF support and 28 national and international NGOs, the following situation was revealed:

  • 25% of Haitian children aged 5 to 17 live apart from their biological parents;
  • More than 400,000 children, of which 52% of girls are involved in domestic work;
  • 207,000 children aged 5 to 14 are in unacceptable forms of domestic work;
  • About 60% of children in unacceptable working conditions are girls who are mainly employed in urban areas;
  • High socio-economic precariousness of households explains this practice in most cases.

The joint steering committee reminds us of the need to reinforce synergies between actors to provide a multisectoral response to the problem of insecurity that leads to the exploitation of children through the worst forms of work. The Minister insists for:

  • a great mobilization of the actors at the level of the other Ministries and NGOs concerned in all the stages of the project.
  • The development of advocacy action in parliament for the adoption of ILO Convention 189 on Domestic Workers and the Child Protection Code Act, and the revision of the Labor Code;
  • The establishment of a Child Protection Cluster that will bring together the actors at the strategic level regarding child protection.

With such a commitment to the summit and such a mobilization of development actors, hope is allowed when reducing exposure to domestic work for girls and boys in Haiti.

Eliminate cholera in Haiti by the rapid response teams

UNICEF Haiti works with its partners such Solidarités International to support the rapid response strategy of the Ministry of Public Health and Population in order to eliminate cholera with its rapid response teams. This is the story of Michel-Ange

UNICEF: Strengthen Nutrition for the well-being of children

the brachial perimeter is measured

UNICEF is one of the most important partners of the Haitian government in the field of Nutrition. Field interventions are carried out through several non-governmental partners, including the Foundation for the Development and Supervision of the Haitian Family (FONDEFH), which provides technical support to the Ministry of Health in the implementation of nutrition services.

Port-au-Prince, January 31, 2018- The voice of Vanessa Joseph, 20, is very weak, nearly inaudible, forcing one to get close to hear what she says. She holds in her hands her little boy Israel, 8 months old, whom she’s brought in for treatment. The child suffers from severe acute malnutrition (SAM), according to one of the nurses. He was diagnosed when his mother visited a community center in Delmas 75 (Port-au-Prince).

Vanessa sits in the waiting room trying to contain the ardor of her child. In the background, the sound of cars, as the community clinic of Delmas 75 is in the middle of a busy neighborhood. On the floor below, voices of patients and the cries of children being treated are heard.

“Today is Israel’s follow-up appointment. I did not know that this center existed, I was told about it and I took my son. I am satisfied with the service I received, and I did not pay anything,” she explains. Since the child was admitted to the program, there has been significant progress.

Vanessa does not work and the father of the child lives in the Dominican Republic. Previously, she lived in another neighborhood, and she was not used to taking her boy to the hospital. She is very happy to have this opportunity now, because where she lived, there was only one vaccination program. For the moment, she lives with her parents near the health center.

Manilande Branchl’homme, a nurse at the health center, says that after screening, the child was given an appetite test to see whether he could be treated on an outpatient basis with a home-based diet or if he had to be hospitalized, anorexia being one of the frequent consequences of malnutrition.

“In our clinic, we take care of home malnutrition by giving the child PlumpyNut, a ready-to-use food formulated to meet the needs of malnourished children along with systematic medical treatment. The children have an appointment each week to monitor their health and growth, and to pick-up their PlumpyNut ration. We also conduct nutrition education sessions for mothers to learn how to better feed their children,” she adds.

A clinic serving the community

People waiting to bring their kids at the Centre Communautaire” of Delmas 75

The Delmas Community Clinic 75 is a health facility managed by FONDEFH, an important technical partner of UNICEF, serving a population estimated at nearly 63,000 people. Daily attendance at the clinic can reach more than 600 people. The community health workers attached to this health facility are manage ongoing outreach work among the population.

The services available within the center are included in a care package called “Community Health”. It includes, among other services, vaccination and nutrition support. HIV care is also a component. There is also a maternity ward and a prenatal clinic within the center.

Nutrition care is free, which is vital for the disadvantaged populations attending the center, and provided thanks to the support of donors including UNICEF.

UNICEF a key partner of Nutrition

“Nutrition is a fundamental element in the survival and development of the child. It is therefore essential to provide these services to the most vulnerable families and those living in the most remote areas of the country. What we want is to have healthy children and UNICEF works with the Haitian State and partners to provide these services,” said Marc Vincent, UNICEF Representative in Haiti.

In terms of nutrition services to the Haitian population, there are several UNICEF country program objectives worth recalling: UNICEF will provide technical support to reinforce the leadership and coordination capacity of the Coordination Unit of the National Program for Food and Nutrition; UNICEF will ensure that nutrition efforts prioritize the 1,000-day window of opportunity from conception to 2 years of age; UNICEF will ensure that health facilities and community stakeholders in communes most affected by malnutrition have the capacity to provide pregnant and lactating women and children under 5 years of age with a package of quality, cost-effective nutrition services.

 

 

 

 

 

Camille Lacourt in Haiti believes donations can help.

Here in Haiti, more than 4.8 million people do not have access to a source of drinking water. 4.8 million people, that’s 36% of the population, a statistic that Camille Lacourt wants to change by its humanitarian implication. Landed on the island of Hispaniola on February 19 for a five-day stay, the five-time World Swimming Champion was able to see with his own eyes the tremendous work done on the ground by UNICEF and its various partners.

“We see that there is a lot of work and that it works quickly” says the French celebrity, sponsor of the Nuit de l’Eau. This presence in Haiti of Camille Lacourt was aimed at seeing and witnessing UNICEF’s action on the ground and seeing how the funds collected by the Nuit de l’Eau are used.

Camille Lacourt, parrain de la nuit de l’eau, visite l’école de Trianon à Mirebalais. Cette école est “Hygiene friendly school” soutenue par l’UNICEF.
Des enfants se lavent les mains et peuvent accéder à des toilettes séparées grâce au soutien de l’UNICEF.

“All donations are useful. There has been a lot of work done but there is still a lot left. Haiti is not just earthquakes and hurricanes. Do not help only at these times but a little bit all the time, ” explains Camille.

In the department of the Center, Camille was able to see everything that was done and all the difficulties encountered to bring the drinking water from the sources to the populations. At La Chapelle he visited a water system damaged by Hurricane Irma. Thanks to the many donations, this supply system has been rehabilitated and many water points are now cleaned up. In total, 910,000 people now have access to a drinking water point.

Also in the Center, he was able to meet the students of the National School of Trianon in Mirebalais, one of the 152 “friendly schools of hygiene”. There, with UNICEF support, children can wash their hands and can access separate toilets. These programs were partly funded by public generosity at the 2017 Nuit de l’Eau.

“For us when we are lucky to come on the field, we see that the work has really been done and is being done. That’s the message I’m trying to convey: donations, it’s useful, it’s really helpful” says Camille Lecours

Accompagné du médecin Karine Sévère, responsable du CTC de Port au Prince, Camille Lacourt, parrain de la nuit de l’eau, visite les installations et les malades atteints de cholera ou de diarrhée aïgues.

Finally in Port-au-Prince in the West Department, accompanied by the doctor Karine Sévère, doctor in charge, he visited the “Centre de Traitement du Choléra et de Diarrhée Aigüe Gheskio” and a water chlorination point in the Bristou district in Petionville.

“It’s very far from what we know but yes I relativize a lot saying that I was very lucky to be able to do my sport in pools filled with water and that here there is not enough, so that gives me even more desire to talk about that “added Camille Lacourt.

A CHANCE TO LIVE FOR HAITIAN CHILDREN.

Together, we can give each child more than a day, more than a month, more than survival.

Did you know that every year in Haiti, 9600 children die at birth? Although impressive and unacceptable, this figure is still marginal on a global scale. Indeed, according to a new report on neonatal mortality published today by UNICEF and available here, there are 7,000 newborns in the world who die every day.

“We know that the vast majority of these babies can be saved by providing affordable, quality health care for every mother and newborn. Small gestures from each of us would help ensure the first steps of these newborns in life. Says Henrietta H. Fore Executive Director of UNICEF.

In Haiti, at the maternity Isaie Jeanty near Cité-Soleil, a rather difficult area of the capital Port-au-Prince, this little miracle occurs every day. For Liliane Jean-Charles, a young mother living in the area of Canapé Vert, this second universal experience of childbirth went very well for her.

Children

Liliane Jean-Charles, a young mother living in the area of Canapé Vert, this second universal experience of childbirth went very well for her. She loves children.

“There was pain, but the doctors took very good care of me during the delivery says Liliane. Despite the rather limited technical resources of this maternity, Liliane really felt that there was a pair of safe hands to accommodate her baby at birth and in the minutes that followed. “They showed a lot of patients waiting for the baby to show up,” says Liliale, already standing next to her bed, just minutes after giving birth.

His baby named Christopher is his second: “I love children because it’s a gift from God. It’s a gift that embellishes the house. Because without children, there are no flowers in the house.”

Thanks to the care of MIJ medical staff, Liliane Jean-Charles and her little Christopher will be able to return home quickly.

For the year 2017, 3340 childbirths were performed at the Maternity Isaie Jeanty of Port-au-Prince. UNICEF is contributing in his way to this challenge by strengthening the technical and logistical capacities of the maternity ward by distributing various equipment, accessories and materials such as gynecological tables, medical instruments and products.

Together, we can give each child more than a day, more than a month, more than survival.

#EveryChildALIVE

For more informations https://www.unicef.org/french/every-child-alive/

Editorial of Marc Vincent, UNICEF Haiti Representative

Young children, waiting outside, during an inauguration of a school

The 2017 is about to come to an end, it has been a year rich in intervention for UNICEF Haiti. We have supported the actions of the Government of Haiti and reinforcing its capacities in the areas that have been linked to survival and development of the children. Our actions are guided by our mandate which is the wellbeing of all the children.

It is the principle of equity that guides us to allow the most vulnerable children and families and those living in the most remote places to benefit from a life-saving humanitarian intervention. UNICEF has been on all fronts this year 2017.

Among other actions:

-The certification of foster families is part of one of the alternatives to placement of children in institutions. We also proceeded to the Certification of ” Schools Friend of Hygiene” with partners. Children will be able to evolve in a healthier environment.

– UNICEF has also contributed to strengthening the health system by providing technical support to the MSPP and developing community health systems by training community health workers and strengthening the network of health workers. These agents will help save lives.

– From January to September, more than 32,000 children aged 6 to 24 months and 22,000 pregnant and lactating women received several micronutrients to improve their diet and fight iron deficiency anemia.

In addition, we continued with our interventions in the departments affected by Matthew:

  • UNICEF enabled access to safe water to more than 640,000 people since the passage of Hurricane Matthew.
  • 120 schools damaged by Hurricane Matthew have been rehabilitated, which facilitated the return to class for over 30,000 students. More than 10,000 items of school furniture were provided in 139 schools, and 27,000 children received psychosocial support.
  • In 2017, a total of 10,628 children under five with severe acute malnutrition and 7,381 children with moderate acute malnutrition were treated. More than 32,000 children 6-24 months of age, and 22,725 pregnant and lactating women received micronutrients.

Due to climate change, cyclones are becoming more and more devastating. Strengthening awareness of risk and disaster management is a priority. We held consultations with young people in the South and Grand’Anse, the two departments most affected by Hurricane Matthew. Awareness also goes through our youth and adolescents.

2017 is leaving and 2018 is already knocking on the door. There will be new challenges, because the important thing is to capitalize on the good results recorded but also to correct those who deserve to be. Nevertheless, the goals will remain the same, creating an environment that allows Haitian children to develop their full potential.

We must strengthen the fight against cholera, victory is at hand, we can eliminate cholera.

I send a special greeting to all the children of Haiti, to our partners, and I wish you all a happy holiday.

 

Marc Vincent

Representative

ACAT in Nirva a model of continuity

The ACAT committe with partners Zanmi Lasante and UNICEF

The locality of Nirva (Department of Centre) is one of the first to be declared “End of open defecation” (ODF). Since the committee “Community Approach to Total Sanitation (ACAT) is doing everything possible, between hygiene awareness and home visit, to allow the community to continue on this good start. Cholera has virtually disappeared in this community.

“ACAT has had a major impact in the community. Before, cholera was wreaking havoc. Community members came together to solve the problem by helping people build toilets so that it does not happen again, “says Wilfrid Moise, chair of Nirva’s ACAT committee, who is satisfied with the current situation.

The locality has 150 families, there were only 66 latrines. As part of the ACAT, people have built nearly 42 latrines. Nirva is part of the communal section of Grand Boucan.

André Aimable, a member of the community, still remembers the difficult times the population had to go through, concerning the spread of cholera. “The ACAT is an extremely important experience for us, because before the parents had a lot of sadness. When their children had cholera, by taking them to the treatment center, they did not know if the children would come back alive, “he recalls.

DINEPA, UNICEF and Zanmi Lasante came to them, raising awareness about the importance of latrines and promoting hygiene. They decided to take part in the program.

Difficulties to accept the project

A Latrine with the tipitap

Initially it was not easy, as members of the population expected to receive material or financial assistance to build the latrines. This was even more difficult, as at the same time other organizations were building free latrines. The committee members showed patience and pedagogy to convince people to agree to build the latrines themselves.

“We had to explain to them that they will be the big beneficiaries of these latrines. Because it will be a considerable gain for the health of their children and for them too. We all need these latrines and we are witnessing the ravages of cholera, we have to get together to get there, “says Casséus Mercidieu, another member of the committee.

To dig the holes of the latrines, it needed willpower and courage. The committee members gathered at the end of the day by helping the people of the community. There was a snowball effect and everyone wanted a toilet. The toilets are built with the means of the edge, either in straws, in cloths, and rarely in concrete.

The community was declared “End of Open Defecation” (ODF) in February 2015 and there is a big testimonial party. “Since then we have never had a case of cholera in our community,” says Casseus, satisfied.

A coalition of all partners for monitoring

Jean Montas, Community WASH Officer, within Nirva, is responsible for hygiene awareness. He admits that he has no free time because he must make regular visits to the homes to make sure that certain hygiene rules are respected. For example, if the latrines are clean, if the openings are covered, if the tipitap (sort of gallon for washing hands) are in good working condition. Hygiene awareness is raised in schools, in churches, and in all places of assembly. Jean Montas puts the emphasis on the measures to be applied to avoid catching cholera.

He wonders when he can take a vacation. “But we belong to the locality, we must help people, it is the mission that I gave myself,” he says.

UNICEF supports Zanmi Lasante, implementation partner in Central Plateau. It is executed with the support of the National Directorate of Drinking Water and Sanitation (DINEPA) and the Ministry of Public Health and Population.

Rapid response teams: a real rampart against cholera

A rapid response team in the Department of Centre

The numbers of cholera cases have significantly reduced in 2017. They have never been so low. The new Cholera strategy has paid off. At the center of attention are the rapid response teams, who are true warriors. The members will fight cholera in the targeted departments, in good weather or rainy weather. Mainly in the department of Centre (Plateau Central), where the distances to be covered are sometimes immense. UNICEF is one of the key players in the fight against cholera in the country.

Mirebalais, November 23, 2017-The all-terrain car is rolling on the rocks, the road is not good. It is necessary to zigzag between the crevasses, to avoid the mud. It rained last night, but conditions are acceptable to reach Menaj, a locality close to the town of Laschaobas (Centre).

ACTED’s rapid response team, UNICEF’s partner, with their recognizable green T-shirts from several meters, is on the warpath. They come to conduct an awareness session. But the community is quiet because today is market day. However, there are still people who will be able to listen to messages and receive hygiene kits if it’s needed.

A member of the team with a loudspeaker has already broken off to bring together the people who are present. In the empty valley, his voice is echoed. He managed to gather about twenty women and a few children. Men are in the fields.

Important to continue awareness

A sensitization session

The team begins to raise awareness about hygiene. Today, the team is there for a reinforcement of awareness. It usually takes place after the distribution of hygiene kits. These kits contain soap, oral rehydration serum, and aquatabs (chlorine tablets) and a pail with a robinet.

“You have to wash your hands in crucial moments, before eating and after getting out of the toilet. Use treated water for your health and that of your children’’. After these messages, the team asks the residents who do not live too far to bring the water they use to test the chlorine residual, to check if they have followed the instructions.

The activities of rapid response teams consist of three parts: investigation, response, awareness. “Regarding the situation for the Lower Plateau, it’s pretty quiet because we went from 38 cases per week to 14 cases and for the moment it’s only 7 cases,” says Jennyfer Joseph, cholera project manager for the Lower – Central tray.

To travel long distances

One of the biggest challenges for rapid response teams is returning to the long distances they must travel to reach remote locations. Sometimes it can take hours or even days. Because they must sleep on the way, to continue their activities and to make sure that everyone is sensitized to the principles of hygiene.

“In some mountainous places, even mules cannot pass, but we have to go if there are cases of cholera. It’s part of our mission. Sometimes we do missions of several days in these localities to reach everyone, “recalls Nadia Delmond, emergency team leader for Acted, recalling that the reception of people is always positive.

Training Workshop on Education and Eradication of Child Labor

 

The participants at the training

“Education 2030 and the eradication of child labor”. This was the theme of the workshop organized at the International Training Center of the International Labor Organization (ILO) in Turin (Italy) from 06 to 10 November 2017.

The workshop brought together representatives from Burkina Faso, Comoros, Lebanon, Mali, Mauritania, Switzerland and Haiti, including the Director General of the Ministry of Education. One of the objectives was to enable participants to: develop a better understanding of the links between the achievement of the 2030 Education Goal and the elimination of child labor; identify different strategies to combat vulnerability to child labor and exclusion of children from education; reflect on the roles that stakeholders can play in achieving education by 2030 and eliminating child labor by 2025.

Per ILO estimates, about 218 019 000 children are working around the world; 151,622,000 of these children are between the ages of 6 and 14, and 75,525,000 children are performing hazardous work for their health, physical, social or mental development. Dangerous work refers to activities that jeopardize the education of children, activities that affect them in any schooling.

This workshop also allowed participants to review key international frameworks related to education and the issue of child labor. Special attention was paid to the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the various ILO Conventions on the minimum age for employment, and the worst forms of child labor, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) specifically Goal 4, which promotes equitable and quality inclusive education.

The eradication of child labor; an obligation

a training session

The participants in this workshop concluded that education and the eradication of child labor cannot be the exclusive business of the Ministries of Education of the countries.

The Director General of the Ministry of National Education and Vocational Training (MENFP), Dr. Meniol Jeune, expressed his appreciation of the participatory approach used by the facilitators and the quality of the exchanges between the participants. It intends to work to sensitize the educational actors on this theme and to promote the eradication of child labor.

Representatives of the Institute of Social Welfare and Research (IBESR) at this training, Peterson Cadet and Marckens Saint-Louis, propose to work on the definition of a training plan for the “protection peers” through sessions of restitution of the fundamental axes of the process of eradication of child labor.

Geslet Bordes, Child Protection Officer at UNICEF Haiti, expressed its satisfaction for the main tools already available on this theme. The knowledge gained during this workshop will be used to operationalize the action plan that will be prepared with the effective participation of MENFP and IBESR.

For quality, inclusive education in Haiti by 2030, let’s all say: “No to child labor, and yes to children in classrooms!”